Africa’s thirst for Human Rights (2)

It can hardly be sieved-the difference between Civil Society and the governments, of course those in governance, elites and the a few who’ve come across this knowledge in a higher learning institutions can; leaving the majority at crossroads. Most education curriculums in Africa aren’t designed this way that Human Rights are ventured into at a later stage not early stage; yet it wouldn’t be expensive if it was otherwise.
Human Rights Vs African beliefs and norms
When one talks of ‘Human Rights’, in Africa this paints a contradicting picture. For instance, in the most traditional African societies the ‘elders’ are meant to be respected and highly regarded as blameless whose orders and decisions are taken unquestionably; a child would never come out and claim to be punished (even under mistreatment) in line with fighting for their rights or a woman over taking a lead in decision making. Yes, this is changing, but slowly and not entirely.
A lady enlightened how rights could simply be taught- from a simple perspective; it’s just a sense of objectivity of how all human beings should be treated, a fair treatment for all that in the end maintains peace in society. So, child rights, women rights, workers’ rights to mention but a few may from a broad sense from the African perspective be seen as a disgrace to society.
It may broadly be seen and sensed as a form of selfishness; that most people are still naïve about Human Rights, who and what Civil Society organisations are and as to why all this isn’t directly incorporated into the curriculum at an early stage. Of course, this is the governments’ role and form of sensitization.
Most African citizens should be blamed less for ignorance about Human Rights, since in one way or another they back lash with the African norms and customs and make governments in power unease. Hope an calmer remedy can be sought soon.

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